Counselors

Counselors

Getting lost used to be more common. Just 10 or 15 years ago, before we could rely on our phones and satellites to keep track of us, we had to keep track of ourselves. And we did so imperfectly. At least, my friends and I did. Often, we’d plod along until we registered something recognizable – the Citgo sign by Fenway Park in Boston, that blue doored seafood restaurant, the bridge we crossed earlier in the day – and we would accommodate that new information. Or we would find our way to a map and orient ourselves.  
Just as Tax Day (April 15) was delayed because of where it fell on the calendar, so will the work of many admissions offices who as of today, May 3, have the data they need to confirm the freshman classes of Fall 2016. Sunday was National College Decision Day, which falls on May 1 annually. This is the deadline by which almost all college applicants must choose an undergraduate school. Here are a few pointers to remember, now that you’ve likely made your decision about college. First – CONGRATULATIONS!
“Think about it this way. You’ll have the most success when you categorize your life into two categories – things you can control and things you can’t – and then focus on only the former.” That’s the piece of advice I offer to most of my high school students, especially second-semester juniors. A lot of energy can be put into figuring out rankings, admit rates, and how many biracial, polyglot ice hockey goalies Harvard took last year. To me, that’s energy misplaced.
ED 1, ED 2, Early Action and other decision deadlines explained.   *Please note that the universities named in this article are used as an examples rather than as suggestion of admissions strategy.*   
    Learn what is (and isn't!) important in the "US News & World Report Best Colleges" issue and how to use it to find the best college fit for you.
  Learn what is (and isn't!) important in the "US News & World Report Best Colleges" issue and how to use it to find the best college fit for you. Click here for Part 2!
College admissions committees are a tough crowd. You won’t gain their acceptance with generic, ill-prepared essays; they want insight, solid examples of your experience, quality writing and a genuine voice, to name just a few. Voice, especially, can offer admissions counselors insight into who you are as an individual. It’s a way to stand out from the pack—just be sure that it is your voice you’re using, and not something forced or adopted from someone else.     
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