College Applications

College Applications

BREAKING NEWS! The Common App has yet again changed its application essay prompts – just in time for the 2017-18 application season. Last year we saw no changes whatsoever and in 2015-16 saw only minor tweaks with the introduction of a new prompt. This year brings more tweaks in the form of brand new wording in addition to two entirely new options. There is now a total of seven prompts (up from five), although the word limit remains the same at 650.
Applying to college is taxing, from the first college visit until the final decision is made. Perhaps no time in the process is more stressful than ticking through these cold weeks, politely dodging the questions of aunts and cousins, waiting for a stranger in an office somewhere to decide what your next four years will look like.
Applications take a lot of work. You’ve got to fill out the form in addition to writing essays and getting letters of recommendation. You’ve got to manage deadlines and document your activities. Almost everyone is aware of those requirements, but what’s often overlooked – due to either carelessness, hastiness, or laziness – are the little details. For example, the application will ask for your counselor’s middle initial. You have to answer how many weeks per year and hours per week you participate in, say, Model United Nations.
      How do I set up a college interview?
December and April are two months in the college admissions cycle known for notifications. If you apply early action or early decision to a college, you’ll likely receive a decision in December (although some, such as University of Virginia, University of North Carolina, and University of Maryland notify in January). If you apply regular decision, you will likely hear back in April (although a number of schools are notifying in March and even February).
  Last week I received an email that I was placed on a college’s waiting list. Waiting lists are getting more common these days, so getting pushed to the waitlist isn’t newsworthy necessarily. What is unusual is that I’m in my 30s and not at all planning on going back to undergraduate college. So what’s the story? Here’s the email (with the school redacted):
October 15, November 1, November 15, December 1, January 1, February 1 – these dates have come and gone, and with them so have many college application deadlines.
Early Decision and Early Action Notifications are beginning to trickle out now! Here’s how to respond. Many students take advantage of early deadlines for a number of reasons, and there are a few responses that might be released in early to mid-December. Here they are: ACCEPTANCE
By Jeff Knox Here’s a fun SAT math problem: If a college applicant applies to 20 schools, each with a 5 percent admission rate, what is the probability that she will be accepted to at least one of those schools? Is it 5 percent? 100 percent?
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